Lo and behold! The EMC community expert! Or something?

By Renegade on Thursday 15 October 2009 10:26 - Comments (4)
Categories: EMC, General, Views: 3.162

About two weeks back (Friday October 2nd to be exact), I received an e-mail from Erin Capellman. She's one of the people working for EMC and seems to be at least partially, if not even full time, responsible for the EMC community network.

Basically it's the same as a lot of other online communities. People meet in a digital environment and exchange ideas, meet peers and get new information. Something that can be quite useful and add a lot of value to projects you are working on.

Apparently someone noticed that I spend some time asking and answering questions, or even talking about ideas or trends in the EMC community. The e-mail stated that:
EMC has initiated a program across all communities, entitled the EMC
Community Expert program, to recognize outstanding member contributions.
Only 20 individuals have been selected to receive this leadership
designation. You were nominated by managers across EMC communities
because you have consistently demonstrated extraordinary commitment to
helping customers, partners, or employees.

...

We deeply appreciate the time and commitment that you continue to make
to EMC, its customers, partners and employees. Thank you and
congratulations from all the communities of EMC and their thousands of
members.
Now, it's quite nice to get such a mail, but it also made me think if this is something related to a persons interests. The answer is yes. You can't be successful or spend a certain amount of time just because you are hoping to get some recognition. It simply won't work.

However, I am convinced that certain people have a nack for communicating online. Be it in a community or by various other means. When I look at my own "online CV" I can look back at quite a history. I've been part of a very big community right here at Tweakers.net and got a good feel on how to talk to people online.

I don't know if this made a huge difference in getting the above "leadership designation", but I am certain it didn't hurt. Yesterday they announced the community experts on the various pages, and it's kind of funny to see a picture of youself online with such a title:

http://tweakers.net/ext/f/jwn5WhakHfIXwnXcBIMCC9Ox/full.png

So, to end this with a question. Is being successful in one online community also beneficial if you want to be successful in other online communities?

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Comments


By Tweakers user punisher007, Thursday 15 October 2009 10:59

Sure, it shows you have the right attitude at least.

By Tweakers user i-chat, Thursday 15 October 2009 13:10

not only attitude i might add...

'living' inside a community is hard work, compared to say explaining $somethingelse in real life, - i think that textbased comunication is allways a bit more difficult than talking to somewhone live...

btw - congrats on your promotion ...

By Tweakers user YopY, Thursday 15 October 2009 13:15

So, to end this with a question. Is being successful in one online community also beneficial if you want to be successful in other online communities?
Nope. I run a good active community (forums) and am the man on there pretty much, but fail to stand out here on T.net - I think. Possibly because there's people on my level here, and people who don't know anything about anything slightly technical on there.

By Tweakers user punisher007, Friday 16 October 2009 17:46

@ YopY while success is not guaranteed it CAN be beneficial :)

Comments are closed